How can storm water be managed in a community garden, located on an unused plot close to the coast, using sustainable practices for energy conservation?

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Issue Date
2020-05-06
Authors
Bunch, Joseph
Publisher
Department of Urban Horticulture and Design of the State University of New York, Farmingdale State College
Keywords
Coastal , Community Garden , Conservation , CSA , Energy , Farm , Flooding , Fruits , Native Plants , Permeable , Rain garden , Saltwater , Stormwater , Sustainability , Vegetable
Abstract
The site used for this project is a 64-acre plot in West Sayville, Long Island NY. The area in West Sayville close to the coast has great potential for varied uses. Using an area within the site for a community garden provides a place for locals to get fresh goods in their community backyards. The area is presently an unused lot with a greenhouse already on it, and a large quantity of space to use, 130,000 sq. ft. This project establishes a community garden that is maintained and cared for by a non-profit in the area. Storm water management is implemented in the area of the community garden. Management options are sustainable for the environment and utilize native plantings. The area is evaluated to see the flooding heights, storm water flooding, and the drainage in the area. Indoor greenhouse grows and raised beds will be utilized in this area as it will undergo flooding normally. This research seeks to answer the above question “How can storm water be managed in a community garden, located on an unused plot close to the coast, using sustainable practices for energy conservation?”. This is a problem that I believe many people face and could benefit from, not only in Long Island, NY, or the United States, but all over the world. There are many locations that experience storm water flooding and do not have access to fresh vegetables and produce. Being able to research and find a way to establish community gardens that not only are sustainable but also encourage community involvement will benefit areas of the world.
Description
A Design Capstone submitted to the Department of Urban Horticulture and Design of the State University of New York, Farmingdale State College, May 2020, Long Island, NY. Advised by Professor Stevie Famulari, Gds. Course: HORT 474 - Capstone.
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