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dc.contributor.authorSnell, Jacob
dc.date.accessioned2022-11-10T20:53:46Z
dc.date.available2022-11-10T20:53:46Z
dc.date.issued2022
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1951/83077
dc.descriptionThis is one of two 3rd place winners in the FODL Undergraduate Student Writing Contesten_US
dc.description.abstractThe American criminal justice system does not exist apart from society; how we conceive criminality and how we punish criminals institutionalizes certain philosophical assumptions and intuitions about human nature and free will. Philosophical justifications for punishment can be bifurcated into the consequentialist and deontological ethical categories, the former including utilitarian rationales such as deterrence, incapacitation and rehabilitation, and the latter theories of retribution (retributive justice).en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipFriends of Drake Libraryen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesFriends of Drake Library-Library Research Awards;
dc.titleThumbs Up for Retribution: Capital Punishment, Neuroscience, and Cultureen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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