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dc.contributor.authorJaeger, Tristan
dc.contributor.authorAdams, Matthew
dc.contributor.authorStaats, Lloyd
dc.contributor.authorGarneau, Danielle
dc.contributor.authorLesser, Mark
dc.date.accessioned2020-05-12T17:52:36Z
dc.date.available2020-05-12T17:52:36Z
dc.date.issued2020-05-05
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1951/71164
dc.descriptionAccompanying Adobe Spark presentation available at https://spark.adobe.com/page/C22NYxd3ciNoW/en_US
dc.description.abstractForest disturbance can drastically alter wildlife habitat (i.e., cover, forage and prey abundance). Response of wildlife to disturbance events, particularly the timing involved in returning to pre-disturbance conditions, are important aspects of overall ecosystem recovery and resilience. Here, we study wildlife occurrence and usage patterns following a disturbance at a sandstone pavement pine barren in northern NY. This site is dominated by Pinus banksiana (Jack Pine) with an understory largely comprised of Vaccinium angustifolium (Low-bush Blueberry) and Gaylussacia baccata (Huckleberry) serving as a major wildlife resource and fuel for this fire-dependent system. In July 2018, ~220ha of this forest was burned in a wildfire. In fall 2018, eight game cameras were installed along transects traversing a gradient of burn severity as well as an adjacent unburned reference area. Annual and seasonal abundances, and diel wildlife activity were characterized using the camTrap package in R Studio. Over the course of the study, overall species richness in the unburned and burned areas were differed (n= 15 and n= 13 respectively), though total occurrences were higher in the unburned (n = 361) than in the burned area (n = 480). Common species captured on the barren include Odocoileus virginianus (White-tailed Deer), Lepus americanus (Snowshoe Hare), and Tamiasciurus hudsonicus (Red Squirrel) which more prevalent in the unburned, while Canis latrans (Coyote) were more common in the burned area. Seasonal trends in wildlife abundance show a clear benefit to being in the unburned area in fall through winter 2018 as it provides resources and hiding cover. In spring, wildlife increased activity within the regenerating burn which remained in high use until summer-fall 2019. Interestingly, Coyote’s use of burned and unburned areas tracks that of their Snowshoe Hare prey and is most pronounced in the burn during spring. At the barren, Snowshoe Hare and Coyote behave nocturnally as compared the diurnal activity of White-tailed Deer. In the unburned area, Coyote appear to shift activity to capture the morning peak of Deer. Further long-term monitoring will elucidate how wildfire affects wildlife community composition, abundance, and distribution on the Altona Flat Rock sandstone pavement barren.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.rightsAttribution-NoDerivs 3.0 United States*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/3.0/us/*
dc.subjectgame camerasen_US
dc.subjectwildlifeen_US
dc.subjectwildfireen_US
dc.subjectwhite-tailed deeren_US
dc.subjectcoyoteen_US
dc.subjectsnowshoe hareen_US
dc.subjectsandstone pavement barrenen_US
dc.subjectjack pineen_US
dc.titleCamera trap monitoring of wildlife following a wildfire at the Altona Flat Rock foresten_US
dc.typePresentationen_US


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Attribution-NoDerivs 3.0 United States
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution-NoDerivs 3.0 United States