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dc.contributor.authorLi, Ruizhi
dc.date.accessioned2019-06-19T20:33:51Z
dc.date.available2019-06-19T20:33:51Z
dc.date.issued2019-05
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1951/70829
dc.description.abstractThe thesis research is informed by the quotidian, and provokes a reconsideration of what is overlooked. The resulting compositions reflect the intangible divinity and spirituality that are embedded in the mundane. It is riveting to see new interactions between people and objects, and between objects and objects. I am also curious about how viewers might participate in these modified relationships, and how such connections are formed.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 United States*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/us/*
dc.subjectResearch Subject Categories::HUMANITIES and RELIGION::Aesthetic subjects::Arten_US
dc.subjectMetal Exhibitionsen_US
dc.subjectArt -- Philosophyen_US
dc.subjectSpirituality in arten_US
dc.titleMinutiae: MFA Thesis - Metalen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


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Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 United States
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 United States