Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorHorowitz, Eli
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-31T13:26:13Z
dc.date.available2018-05-31T13:26:13Z
dc.date.issued2018-05
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1951/70270
dc.description.abstractI propose that the current criteria for diagnosing Psychopathy, the Psychopath Checklist Revised (PCL-R), is biased towards criminal and antisocial tendencies. While it may be an accurate screening method and means of predicting recidivism in antisocial Psychopaths, it does not shed light on the countless other individuals who may be thought of as “prosocial” psychopaths. There may very well be many individuals who satisfy much of the existing criteria for psychopathy and exhibit the neuro-morphology typical in antisocial psychopaths, but do not exhibit antisocial behavior and thus would not be tested, nor receive a score on the PCL-R that would classify them as a psychopath. I will examine the methods present in identifying psychopaths today and propose the idea that amongst us are many more.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 United States*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/us/*
dc.subjectPsychologyen_US
dc.subjectPCL-Ren_US
dc.subjectPsychopathyen_US
dc.subjectRecidivismen_US
dc.subjectProsocialen_US
dc.titleThe inadequacies of the Psychopath Checklist Revised (PCL-R)en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 United States
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 United States