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dc.contributor.advisor
dc.contributor.authorCagar, Nicole
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-29T18:16:14Z
dc.date.available2018-05-29T18:16:14Z
dc.date.issued2018-05
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1951/70253
dc.description.abstractAfter the fall of the Nazi regime, Germany’s immigration policy drastically changed. The need for guest workers (Gastarbeiter) was high in order to rebuild German infrastructure, with a majority of the guest workers coming from Turkey. Prior to and after the fall of the Berlin Wall, ethnic German Russians (Aussiedler) repatriated back to Germany, representing a second major wave of immigrants in the postwar era. The contemporary international crisis in Syria has led to an influx of refugees and Arabic speaking populations in Germany. As a result of these historical shifts in the latter half of twentieth century Germany to the present, Germany has taken language acquisition more seriously and consequently sees itself as an immigration nation. This is an overview of scholarship informing the context for second language acquisition among immigrants in Germany. This study explores language acquisition among these groups and finds that Turkish people do the best at learning German.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 United States*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/us/*
dc.subjectHonors Thesesen_US
dc.subjectInternational relationsen_US
dc.subjectGermanen_US
dc.subjectIntegrationen_US
dc.subjectLanguage acquisitionen_US
dc.subjectRussianen_US
dc.subjectTurkishen_US
dc.subjectSyrianen_US
dc.subjectRefugeesen_US
dc.subjectArabicen_US
dc.subjectImmigrationen_US
dc.subjectAssimilationen_US
dc.subjectDiscriminationen_US
dc.subjectAlphabeten_US
dc.titleSecond language acquisition in immigrant groups in Germanyen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.coverage.subject


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Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 United States
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 United States