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dc.contributor.authorTozser, Timea
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-14T18:01:16Z
dc.date.available2018-05-14T18:01:16Z
dc.date.issued2018-05
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1951/70207
dc.description.abstractDepression is identified as one of the most common mental illnesses in the United States (NIMH, 2014). To understand such prevalence, many researchers have focused on the cognitive patterns associated with depression, suggesting that depressed individuals focus their attention on experiences of disappointment, worthlessness, and rejection (Gotlib & Joormann, 2010). This may include counterfactual thinking patterns that center upon detrimental “what ifs” that impede meaning-making, a process known to benefit individuals and reduce stigma. Accordingly, the purpose of the current study was to explore the relationship between depression, counterfactual thinking, and stigma. Using a mixed methods design, participants were randomly assigned to consider ways in which their life might have been better or worse if they had never had depression. They also completed a series of questionnaires and open-ended questions. The results indicated that individuals who were randomly assigned and prompted to think either about negative and positive counterfactuals perceived higher levels of stigma than those in the control group. Additionally, individuals who wrote about ways their life would be better without depression reported greater meaning making than those who wrote about ways their life could have been worse. Lastly, systematic differences in emergent themes of meaning-making were identified between groups. The current research sheds light on depression narratives and how individuals create meaning about depression.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 United States*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/us/*
dc.subjectDepression, Mentalen_US
dc.subjectResearch Subject Categories::SOCIAL SCIENCES::Social sciences::Psychologyen_US
dc.subjectDepression, Mental -- Psychologyen_US
dc.subjectCounterfactuals (Logic)en_US
dc.subjectStigma (Social psychology)en_US
dc.subjectCounterfactual thinkingen_US
dc.subjectStigmaen_US
dc.subjectMeaning makingen_US
dc.subjectNarrativesen_US
dc.title"What if I had never been depressed?": effect of counterfactual thinking on stigma for individuals who have experienced depressionen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


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Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 United States
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 United States