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dc.contributor.authorAdams, Ellen E.
dc.contributor.authorBeatty, Joshua F.
dc.date.accessioned2018-04-11T19:15:44Z
dc.date.available2018-04-11T19:15:44Z
dc.date.issued2014-05-24
dc.identifier.citationAdams, Ellen E., and Joshua F. Beatty. "Developing Scientific Womanpower: Gender and the Cold War-Era Science Fair." Paper presented at the Berkshire Conference on the History of Women, Toronto, May 24, 2014.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1951/70043
dc.description.abstractThis paper examines the intersection of gender and science in the U.S. during the Cold War by looking at girls' participation in science fairs. Official rhetoric encouraged both boys and girls to develop their skills in science and technology in the interest of national security, and in the years after World War II science fairs became popular vehicles for the display and promotion of science. Although boys participated in larger numbers than girls, young women were visible participants in science fairs, both at the local level and in national competitions such as the Westinghouse Science Talent Search (established in 1942) and the National Science Fair (begun in 1950).en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectscience fairen_US
dc.subjectgenderen_US
dc.subjectcold waren_US
dc.subjecteducational sociologyen_US
dc.titleDeveloping Scientific Womanpower: Gender and the Cold War-Era Science Fairen_US
dc.typePresentationen_US


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