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dc.contributor.authorMcGrattan, James
dc.date.accessioned2018-03-28T18:40:15Z
dc.date.available2018-03-28T18:40:15Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1951/69700
dc.descriptionSenior capstone poster, Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, SUNY Plattsburghen_US
dc.description.abstractDevelopmental stuttering affects ~5% of preschool-aged children. While stuttering disappears in the majority of these children within 3 years after onset, it persists into adulthood in 1% of children. Determining anatomical and physiological differences in the brain between persisting and recovering stuttering may lead to early prediction of risk/non-risk, and thus, early intervention can be appropriately implemented.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectstutteringen_US
dc.subjectneuroimagingen_US
dc.subjectrecoveryen_US
dc.titleNeurological Predictors of Persistent Versus Recovered Developmental Stutteringen_US
dc.typePresentationen_US


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