Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorCarmen, Rachael A.
dc.date.accessioned2014-01-28T18:57:36Z
dc.date.available2014-01-28T18:57:36Z
dc.date.issued2014-01-28
dc.identifier.otherHQ29.C37 2013
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1951/63469
dc.description.abstractHuman sexuality is fascinating. Though it is such an integral part of our everyday lives, our understanding is lacking (to say the least)--especially when it comes to female sexuality. "Human" sexuality has been studied for nearly a hundred years, but the findings were usually in regard to males (as was most psychological research at the time). Because of this unbalance, this research attempts to answer questions solely surrounding female sexuality. In order to truly piece apart female sexuality, one hundred and forty five females at a small college in the Northeast were given three sexuality scales: (The Sexual Self-Efficacy Scale for Female Functioning (SSES) (Bailes et al., 1998), The Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) (Rosen et al., 2000) and The Sexual Self-Schema Scale (SSSS) (Andersen & Cyranowski, 1994)). Additionally, to ascertain what variables play key roles in female sexuality, they were also given the Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire (TEI-Que) (Schutte et al., 1998), The High-K scale (Giosan, 2006), The Mating Intelligence Scale (slightly revised) (MI) (Geher & Kaufman, 2007), and The Perceived Stress Reactivity Scale (PSRS) (Schlotz, Yim, Zoccola, Jansen & Schulz, 2011). Statistical analyses show that Emotional Intelligence and Life History Strategy are strongly positively correlated with higher levels of sexuality.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectSex psychological aspectsen_US
dc.subjectWomen sexual behavioren_US
dc.titleUntangling the complexities of female sexuality: a mixed approachen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record