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dc.contributor.advisorMartienssen, Roberten_US
dc.contributor.authorHan, Jong-Jinen_US
dc.contributor.otherDepartment of Biochemistry and Cell Biologyen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-24T16:38:19Z
dc.date.available2013-05-24T16:38:19Z
dc.date.issued1-Dec-12en_US
dc.date.submitted12-Decen_US
dc.identifierStonyBrookUniversityETDPageEmbargo_20130517082608_116839en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1951/60260
dc.description156 pg.en_US
dc.description.abstractTransposable elements (TE) are indispensible to understand the evolution of genes and genomes in almost all organisms. DNA transposable elements, class 2 elements, have become a source of material for coordination of eukaryotic gene regulatory systems and for chromosomal reconstruction. In particular, mobility of DNA transposons has been used for insertional mutagenesis to generate new alleles in plants and animals. The well-known MuDR/Mu system in maize has been adopted for saturation mutagenesis and allowed for the production of myriads of novel mutant alleles in the Maize-Targeted-Mutagenesis (MTM) collection. However, the potential value of this collection has not been properly realized due to the lack of mapped Mu-insertion alleles. Here, I show that the position of newly transmitted germinal insertions in the genome can be identified on a large scale via next-generation sequencing technology coupled with a GenomeWalker PCR strategy. I found that more than 100 Mu elements per plant transpose mostly into hypomethylated genic regions. In a parallel study, I show that a 1.8-Mb chromosomal inversion, mediated by a novel Mu-like element, is responsible for the classical Tunicate1 mutation in maize. This is because the inversion causes a fusion between Zmm19 MADS box gene 5' regulatory region with the 3' end of another gene, GRMZM2G006297. Interestingly, I found a subsequent regional duplication after the chromosomal rearrangement. Sequencing of the duplication break point suggested that CACTA and MITE transposons, which are another classes of DNA transposons in maize, may be involved in this regional duplication, which results in dosage-dependent upregulation of both genes. Taken together, transposon-mediated chromosomal rearrangement and subsequent regional duplication at Tu1 can influence not only rearrangement of a chromosomal segment but also transcriptional regulatory networks of adjacent genes.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipStony Brook University Libraries. SBU Graduate School in Department of Biochemistry and Cell Biology. Charles Taber (Dean of Graduate School).en_US
dc.formatElectronic Resourceen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherThe Graduate School, Stony Brook University: Stony Brook, NY.en_US
dc.subject.lcshMolecular biology--Cellular biology--Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.otherallelic diversity, chromosomal rearrangement, DNA transposon, transposable element, Tunicate1, zea maysen_US
dc.titleThe Impact of DNA Transposable Elements on Allelic Diversity in Maizeen_US
dc.typeDissertationen_US
dc.description.advisorAdvisor(s): Martienssen, Robert . Committee Member(s): Jackson, David ; Milles, Alea ; Brutnell, Thomas ; Citovsky, Vitaly ;en_US
dc.mimetypeApplication/PDFen_US
dc.embargo.releaseDec-14en_US
dc.embargo.period2 Yearsen_US


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