Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorVaughan, Olufemi , Williams, John Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorNJAGI, MWANGI D.en_US
dc.contributor.otherDepartment of Historyen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-22T17:35:18Z
dc.date.available2013-05-22T17:35:18Z
dc.date.issued1-Dec-11en_US
dc.date.submitted11-Decen_US
dc.identifierNJAGI_grad.sunysb_0771E_10734en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1951/59801
dc.description324 pg.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation examines how imperial education contributed to the crisis of Kenya's postcolonial political leadership. It argues that the system of education inaugurated by the agents of European imperialism, having banished imaginative political leadership of pre-colonial African society and embedded itself as the superior alternative, fashioned African political elite who could not be relied upon to spearhead modernization of their societies. Instead, these elite became more adroit at preserving the same instruments of colonial state that had been used to subjugate Africans. The study reassesses our understanding of colonial education in the context of African colonialism, showing that the common perception that education occupied a binary role as a medium for both the hegemonic and counter-hegemonic projects is untenable. The dissertation shows that colonial education was not divorced from the other apparatuses of the European imperialism. Yet education was more than just a simple tool in the European imperial project. It was the central organ around which the embryonic modern state evolved. In this regard, education occupies several interrelated and dynamic locations throughout this study. One, its serves as the analytical prism through which the story of the broader political evolution of Kenya's modern state is told. The unfolding of this process, beginning from the eve of colonialism when the European missionaries set up their mission stations, the colonial state, to the eventual first postcolonial regime under the African elite, are all examined through this prism. In this narrative, education is also imagined as the arena where national consciousness was nurtured, ideological solidarities marshaled and racial domination constructed and challenged. On the one hand, it gave the colonized communities critical access to the trappings of the new modernity epitomized by the ability to read, write, and use western technology all which they used to assert themselves. On the other hand, the agents of European imperialism sought to legitimize their racial superiority and the very project of imperialism using education. The resultant struggles became negotiations for rights, privileges, and citizenship within a common space where both the colonized and the colonizer had the tools to legitimate their sectarian claims.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipStony Brook University Libraries. SBU Graduate School in Department of History. Charles Taber (Dean of Graduate School).en_US
dc.formatElectronic Resourceen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherThe Graduate School, Stony Brook University: Stony Brook, NY.en_US
dc.subject.lcshHistory--African historyen_US
dc.subject.otherColonial, Education, Imperialism, Kenya, Political Leadership, Postcolonialen_US
dc.titleImperial Education and the Crisis of Political Leadership in Postcolonial Kenyaen_US
dc.typeDissertationen_US
dc.description.advisorAdvisor(s): Vaughan, Olufemi ; Williams, John A. Committee Member(s): Larson, Brooke ; Oyěw??m?Á, Oy?Àr??nk?? ; Arens, William.en_US
dc.mimetypeApplication/PDFen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record