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dc.contributor.advisorHwang, David Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorHubert, Daviden_US
dc.contributor.otherDepartment of Mechanical Engineeringen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-22T17:34:49Z
dc.date.available2013-05-22T17:34:49Z
dc.date.issued1-May-12en_US
dc.date.submitted12-Mayen_US
dc.identifierHubert_grad.sunysb_0771M_10973en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1951/59697
dc.description98 pg.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe function of this thesis is the implementation of a four axis motion system to an Infrared Laser for micromachining applications. The ultimate goal of this project is to assemble a system that allows a user to create a two dimensional pattern that is then processed onto a cylindrical surface by means of a focused laser spot with adjustable speed and radiation source control. This generated system will then be used to examine the interaction between the laser and the material based on different laser powers, frequencies and processing speeds. This interaction will be examined on the surface of the cylinder. This thesis is intended to provide some fundamental knowledge of various types of laser based processing utilizing a four axis motion control system. It will also convey the methodology used during the development of the controls system programming for various patterns. The project began with a four axis motion system (X, Y, Z, and Theta axes) that is designed and manufactured by Rockwell Automation. Setting up the controllers and programming the system are outlined as well as the design specifications of the system. Modifications were made to facilitate laser processing and the methodology of patterning is discussed. Parametric analysis of various frequencies, powers, processing speeds and feature transfer via roller printing to a soft polymer were examined as well as experimentation involving propelled gas to see if there is an improvement in surface patterning. Proprietary samples were also patterned to determine the best processing specifications. Spectrum analyses of various elemental samples were analyzing using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy and the direction of plasma generation based on the incident angle of the processing laser was examined.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipStony Brook University Libraries. SBU Graduate School in Department of Mechanical Engineering. Charles Taber (Dean of Graduate School).en_US
dc.formatElectronic Resourceen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherThe Graduate School, Stony Brook University: Stony Brook, NY.en_US
dc.subject.lcshMechanical engineeringen_US
dc.titleAdvanced Laser Patterning of a Cylindrical Sampleen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.advisorAdvisor(s): Hwang, David J. Committee Member(s): Longtin, Jon ; Kincaid, John.en_US
dc.mimetypeApplication/PDFen_US


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