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dc.contributor.advisorDavila, Joanneen_US
dc.contributor.authorStarr, Lisaen_US
dc.contributor.otherDepartment of Clinical Psychologyen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-15T18:06:55Z
dc.date.available2012-05-15T18:06:55Z
dc.date.issued1-May-10en_US
dc.date.submittedMay-10en_US
dc.identifierStarr_grad.sunysb_0771E_10093.pdfen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1951/55633
dc.description.abstractAnxiety and depression are highly comorbid, and mechanisms of their co-occurrence remain largely unclear. Several longitudinal studies suggest that anxiety disorders tend to temporally precede depression, but few comorbidity theories integrate this information. Furthermore, it is unclear whether this temporal pattern replicates when examining symptoms on a daily basis (potentially the time frame over which comorbidity mechanisms unfold). In addition, little research has attempted to identify mechanisms through which anxiety leads to later depressive symptoms. For example, anxiety may prompt rumination about one's anxiety symptoms, or may lead individuals to feel hopeless, in turn prompting depressive symptoms. The current study uses diary methods to examine several questions: First, does anxious mood precede depressed mood on a daily basis (replicating patterns over longer time frames)? Second, do anxiety-focused rumination and hopelessness mediate this association? Finally, moderation models (where the association between anxious and depressed mood differed according to levels of rumination and hopelessness) were also tested. Fifty-five adults meeting full criteria for generalized anxiety disorder with a history of major depression symptoms were recruited from community sources. Participants completed a 21-day daily survey assessing anxious mood, depressed mood, anxiety-focused rumination, and hopelessness. Results showed that anxious mood predicted later depressed mood much more robustly than the reverse effect, and over multiple time lags. Results were similar for other symptoms of anxiety and depression. Hopelessness did not emerge as a significant mediator or moderator over the time lags tested. A moderational model was supported for anxiety-focused rumination, where anxious and depressed mood were more strongly associated on days when rumination was high. Results provide new, compelling data on the daily temporal patterns of anxiety and depressive symptoms, and offer preliminary suggestion that anxiety-focused rumination may play a role in generating this symptom co-occurrence.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipStony Brook University Libraries. SBU Graduate School in Department of Clinical Psychology. Lawrence Martin (Dean of Graduate School).en_US
dc.formatElectronic Resourceen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherThe Graduate School, Stony Brook University: Stony Brook, NY.en_US
dc.subject.lcshPsychology, Clinicalen_US
dc.subject.otheranxiety, comorbidity, depression, hopelessness, mood, ruminationen_US
dc.titleMechanisms of Anxiety-Depression Co-Occurrenceen_US
dc.typeDissertationen_US
dc.description.advisorAdvisor(s): Joanne Davila. Committee Member(s): Daniel Klein; Greg Hajcak; Bonita London; Joseph Schwartz.en_US
dc.mimetypeApplication/PDFen_US


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