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dc.contributor.advisorMonteyne, Josephen_US
dc.contributor.authorMacchiavello, Carlaen_US
dc.contributor.otherDepartment of Art History and Criticismen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-15T18:04:59Z
dc.date.available2012-05-15T18:04:59Z
dc.date.issued1-May-10en_US
dc.date.submittedMay-10en_US
dc.identifierMacchiavello_grad.sunysb_0771E_10124.pdfen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1951/55542
dc.description.abstractIn this dissertation I examine the links between the body and the territory in Chilean Performance Art, video practices, and conceptual graphics between 1975 and 1985. During ten years in the midst of Augusto Pinochet's military dictatorship, the body and national space were two notions intimately tied to a range of new art forms in which different concepts of identity were negotiated. In the works of Carlos Leppe, Eugenio Dittborn, Carlos Altamirano, Lotty Rosenfeld, and Gonzalo Mezza the corporeal was understood as a space where the repressive political regime could be contested and the self's contradictory relation to the territory and nation be exposed. By analyzing these artists' works and revising the major theoretical and critical writings of the time, particularly those of Nelly Richard, Ronald Kay, and Justo Pastor Mellado, as well as their appropriation and reinterpretation of Poststructuralist and Psychoanalytic theories, this dissertation proposes that carnality and cardinality were joined in the experimental Chilean art of the seventies and early eighties as a form of contesting borders and identities. This work traces varied maps linking artistic and political vanguards while revising the relationships between nationalism and territory in Chilean art of the time by applying a methodology derived from the social history of art, psychoanalysis, and phenomenology. Different theories of space, nationalism, geography, and embodiment are explored to better understand the context and significance of conceptual art in Chile. As the dictatorship was demarcating its own borders regarding Chilean identity, artists were using conceptual languages to define the boundaries of a new national art and create models of social intervention that countered the images of prosperity, progress, and equality advocated by the regime. Using concepts derived from graphic arts and expanding them into everyday life in order to generate different social inscriptions, these artists attempted to demonstrate the instability of borders in the processes of identity construction.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipStony Brook University Libraries. SBU Graduate School in Department of Art History and Criticism. Lawrence Martin (Dean of Graduate School).en_US
dc.formatElectronic Resourceen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherThe Graduate School, Stony Brook University: Stony Brook, NY.en_US
dc.subject.lcshArt History -- Art Criticism -- Performing Artsen_US
dc.subject.otherChile, Conceptual art, Geography, Graphic Art, Performance, Videoen_US
dc.titleMarking the Territory: Performance, video, and conceptual graphics in Chilean art, 1975-1985en_US
dc.typeDissertationen_US
dc.description.advisorAdvisor(s): Donald B. Kuspit. Committee Member(s): Joseph Monteyne; John Lutterbie; Maria Jose Montalva.en_US
dc.mimetypeApplication/PDFen_US


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