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dc.contributor.advisorPeterson, Bradley J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBrisbin, Sterling Jamesen_US
dc.contributor.otherDepartment of Marine and Atmospheric Scienceen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-15T18:02:21Z
dc.date.available2012-05-15T18:02:21Z
dc.date.issued1-May-10en_US
dc.date.submittedMay-10en_US
dc.identifierBrisbin_grad.sunysb_0771M_10090.pdfen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1951/55371
dc.description.abstractThe dominant species of seagrass in NY, Zostera marina, has experienced several historical die-offs and is currently under heavy stress due to water quality and other anthropogenic problems. The consequences of these events on the genetic diversity and population structure of the remaining grass beds are unknown. This thesis addresses questions regarding the genetic diversity of extant populations, and how this information can aid current conservation and restoration efforts. Plant morphometrics and genetic samples of Zostera marina were collected at sites across Great South Bay, Shinnecock Bay, Peconic Bay and the Long Island Sound. Each individual was genotyped at 8 different microsatellite loci. Analysis of microsatellite alleles was used to examine the genetic diversity, population structure and gene flow between meadows within and between bays. Moderate levels of clonal and genetic diversity were exhibited across all study areas. No evidence of local inbreeding or of a severe population bottleneck was found. With the exception of individuals sampled from around Fishers Island in the Long Island Sound, connectivity is high within and between the major Long Island estuaries examined in this thesis. These results suggest the existence of an abundance of potential donor material from Great South Bay, Shinnecock Bay and the Peconics suitable for transplant within or between any of the three bays based on genetic criteria. However, continued monitoring of genetic diversity and additional documentation and small-scale sampling of future restoration efforts is important in maintaining current levels of genetic diversity.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipStony Brook University Libraries. SBU Graduate School in Department of Marine and Atmospheric Science. Lawrence Martin (Dean of Graduate School).en_US
dc.formatElectronic Resourceen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherThe Graduate School, Stony Brook University: Stony Brook, NY.en_US
dc.subject.lcshBiology, Oceanography -- Conservation -- Biology, Molecularen_US
dc.subject.otherConservation, Eelgrass, Genetics, Long Island, Microsatellite, Zosteraen_US
dc.titleGenetic diversity and gene flow in Zostera marina populations across the Long Island Sound and south shore estuariesen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.advisorAdvisor(s): Bradley J. Peterson. Committee Member(s): Christopher Gobler; Eric Bricker.en_US
dc.mimetypeApplication/PDFen_US


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