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dc.contributor.advisorFast, Mark D.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBrown, Aliciaen_US
dc.contributor.otherDepartment of Marine and Atmospheric Scienceen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-11T13:35:08Z
dc.date.available2012-05-11T13:35:08Z
dc.date.issued1-Dec-10en_US
dc.date.submitted1-Dec-10en_US
dc.identifierBrown_grad.sunysb_0771M_10335.pdfen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1951/53488
dc.description.abstractDichelesthium oblongum belongs to the family Dichelesthiidae, within the Suborder Siphonostomatoida, subclass Copepoda (Kabata 1979; Huys and Boxshall 1991). A description of the life cycle and the morphology of its developmental stages is described and compared with that of other organisms within this family and suborder. As expected within the Dichelesthiidae, Dichelesthium oblongum, life cycle appears to consist of nine stages, from nauplius 1 to adult. Sexes are easily distinguished from the 1st copepodid stage on the host through adulthood. General trends include the development of the lateral process on the endopod of the second leg on the male, the drastic elongation of the genital complex of the female, and an increase in size of all appendages in both the male and females through maturation. Atlantic sturgeon are an ancient fish which are parasitized by the marine ectoparasite Dichelesthium oblongum. These parasites have been observed on sturgeon in marine habitats in Europe and on the east coast of North America. D. oblongum were sampled from Atlantic sturgeon along the Atlantic coasts of New York, Connecticut and Delaware from 2007-2010. The life stages of individual parasites were determined. A high infection pressure for this parasite in the late summer/early autumn was observed for Atlantic sturgeon, and based on abundance, prevalence and staging data the Jones Beach sampling area appeared to have the highest infection pressure, potentially even acting as a major source of infection. Prevalence and abundance of D. oblongum was higher along the South shore of New York than Delaware, despite larger fish caught in the latter location, yet this may be a function of temporal differences between the sampling. Using this information, a generation time for D.oblongum was estimated. This information will be useful in determining a epidemiological model for this host-parasite relationship.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipStony Brook University Libraries. SBU Graduate School in Department of Marine and Atmospheric Science. Lawrence Martin (Dean of Graduate School).en_US
dc.formatElectronic Resourceen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherThe Graduate School, Stony Brook University: Stony Brook, NY.en_US
dc.subject.otherAcipenser, Dichelesthium, ectoparasite, oblongum, Siphonostomatoida, sturgeonen_US
dc.titleLife Cycle and Population Dynamics of the marine ectoparasite Dichelesthium oblongum (Copepoda: Dichelesthiidae) on Atlantic sturgeon (Acipenser oxyrinchus oxyrinchus)en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.advisorAdvisor(s): Mark D. Fast. Committee Member(s): Michael Frisk; Adrian Jordaan; Ian Bricknell.en_US
dc.mimetypeApplication/PDFen_US


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