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Pervasive Developmental Disorders: A Golden Section Study

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dc.contributor.author Davison, Mitzie
dc.date.accessioned 2010-03-18T16:27:18Z
dc.date.available 2010-03-18T16:27:18Z
dc.date.issued 2010-03-18T16:27:18Z
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1951/45538
dc.description.abstract Objectives. Pervasive developmental disability theories are combined with golden section research in an effort to understand how people organize and process interpersonal/social information. In order to comprehend theories that explain the social impairments in those diagnosed with a pervasive developmental disorder (PDD), this study employed the golden section hypothesis, which predicts that people organize their interpersonal judgments in a ratio approximately 62% positive and 38% negative. Method. The research was done individually, orally and with visual aids by the researcher with 10 participants with a pervasive developmental disability and 10 undergraduate college participants who did not have any disability. Participants were asked to rate 9 cartoon characters (Garfield, Bugs Bunny, Mickey Mouse, Spongebob Squarepants, Snoopy, Elmo, Tasmanian Devil, Scooby Doo, Fred Flintstone) and one self-category using 12 different bi-polar dimensions (generous-stingy, pleasantunpleasant, true-false, fair-unfair, active-passive, energetic-lethargic, sharp-dull, excitable-calm, strong-weak, bold-timid, hard-soft, rugged-delicate). These dimensions had well-established positive and negative poles. Results. Both pervasive developmentally disabled and normal participants had average positive ratings of the cartoon characters that were not statistically significant from the golden ratio 0.618. Both of these populations rated themselves in a manner consistent with Lefebvre et al (1986), who predicted that people .71 mean positive self-ratings. Conclusion. The results indicate that both PDD and non- PDD participants utilize the golden section ratio. The study supports the robustness of this ratio in a clinical population that has not been previously studied. Due to a small sample size, it is necessary to interpret these results with caution. It would be beneficial for further research to replicate this study with more participants. en
dc.language.iso en_US en
dc.subject Developmental Disabilities -- Research en
dc.subject Behavior disorders in children -- Research en
dc.subject Social Perception in Children -- Research en
dc.subject Child development deviations -- Research en
dc.subject Golden Section en
dc.title Pervasive Developmental Disorders: A Golden Section Study en
dc.type Thesis en


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